Carl Randall at Daiwa Foundation House: the artist as outsider

In his conversation with Andrew Stahl from The Slade School of Fine Art, UCL at Daiwa Foundation House on Thursday, Carl Randall explained how his meticulous paintings evolved from a simple sketch. It might originate from some movements or people’s facial expressions that intrigued him, and then he would make a few quick sketches on the…

power of making at V and A: craftsmanship and imagination

V&A’s latest show The Power of Making is a thoughtful showcase of modern craftsmanship and its relationship with imagination. While the theme is nothing new, I’m struck by the choice of objects in this collection. From gigantic wool knit, a gorilla made of metallic coat hangers, bio-degradable coffins to spray-on fashion, the objects question the…

The candid work of Japanese artist and printmaker Emiko Aida

I came across Emiko Aida‘s art prints first at the International Art Fair this year in Royal College of Art, and later at the art print specialist shop For Art’s Sake in Ealing. A 60x40cm aquatint art print called Reverie in the Rain caught my attention. A girl is asleep, in the background a verdant…

West kowloon arts hub in Hong Kong part 1

Graham Sheffield, former artistic chief of Barbican Centre in London has decided to quit his role as CEO of Hong Kong’s HK$21.6 billion (£1.8 billion) West Kowloon arts hub project after five months. He has resigned due to health reasons, although many think that there must be more that triggered his abrupt decision to leave….

Good morning Hong Kong towel

I am thinking of an artpiece I did a while ago – Good Morning Hong Kong. This is the most traditional towel you can find in Hong Kong, with the Chinese words in red: ‘Wish you a good morning’. Although it is more associated with working classes, I like its down-to-earth character. Decorated with the…

Hong Kong’s favourite: Instant noodles

I was always teased for my love of instant noodles. The midnight cravings for the unhealthy food. The other day I took a close examination at it and manipulate the perspective, with some fascinating findings. The first image shows cooked instant noodles in its original, pure state. The choice of wooden chopsticks is used intentionally….

Henry Moore

With the exhibition on Henry Moore drawing to a close at Tate Britain, I went there for a browse. I had always harboured interest for the artist’s work, ever since I noticed ‘The Oval’ in Exchange Square, Hong Kong. Compared to the two isolated sculptures I saw in my home city, this exhibition at the…

Simplicity and optimism in the work of Christian Købke

The three-month exhibition at the National Gallery featuring Christian Købke’s paintings has done a great job in raising profile of this lesser-known Danish artist who died young, reviving attention towards Købke’s interpretation of characters and colours in his artwork. Anchored in the simplicity of folk life and customs, and with an invested faith in realism, Købke’s work…

Thomas Heatherwick and his super-sculptures

Thomas Heatherwick and his art intrigue me. Years ago, my boss at Swire gave me an interview clip on Heatherwick’s childhood. I find out that Heatherwick, born into a family of artists, harbours a questioning mind since he was a child. He likes to find out new ways of doing things. It’s fascinating how the…